Korea-bound students make traditional dalgona cookies seen in Squid Game

Students showed off their cookery skills when they got the chance to make traditional Korean dalgona cookies that featured in the hit Neflix series Squid Game.

The students from colleges across Capital City College Group (CCCG) joined in the team-building activity as part of their preparations ahead of their trip of a lifetime to Korea this June.

Dalgona is a type of honeycomb toffee made of sugar and baking soda, which has been part of Korean culture for more than 50 years.

Business student Joshua Phung, 19, said “I really enjoyed making the dalgona cookies. When I was watching the tutorial, it looked like it was going to be a walk in the park but it wasn’t as easy as I thought. It took a while to get it right, but it was worth it as they looked pretty and tasted great too.”

Thirty students will be embarking on the trip, which has been funded by the Turing Scheme and organised alongside Keimyung College University (KMCU), Kyungbuk College and JEI University.

During the 20-day trip students will take part in Korean language classes and embark on cultural visits while also gaining knowledge about the growth of smart technology and green sectors in the country and the skills they need for the modern workplace.

In February students visited the Korean Cultural Centre UK to learn more about the country and explore the centre’s archive of books and films and try on traditional clothing called hanbok.

Joshua added: “I’ve not had much experience of travelling abroad and I’m really looking forward to the trip and being able to learn and experience more about the Korean culture, which is quite similar to the Vietnamese culture of my parents. I can’t wait to see the scenic views of Seoul and Daegu.”

CCCG comprises City and Islington College, Westminster Kingsway College and the College of Haringey, Enfield and North East London, and apprenticeship provider Capital City College Training.

Earlier this month Korean Ambassador to the UK Kim Gunn and delegates from the Korean Embassy joined CCCG CEO Roy O’Shaughnessy for lunch at Westminster Kingsway College.

The college, one of the top colleges in the UK for hospitality and culinary arts, was hosting a Korean Cuisine Menu Week in The Brasserie restaurant at its Victoria Centre, as part of its long-standing partnership with the Korean Cultural Centre UK.

The menu included kimchi pancakes, Korean dumplings, Korean fried chicken, beef bulgogi, samgye-tang, bibimbap and sweet pancakes with Korean rice wine ice cream.

Other guests who attended the lunch included Lee Seung-shin, Consul General at the Korean Embassy, and Dr Jungwoo Lee, Director of the Korean Cultural Centre UK.

Mr Gunn welcomed CCCG’s partnership with the Korean Embassy and said students visiting Korea will discover how it is growing in popularity and becoming a market leader on the world stage.

He said: “Korea is a very dynamic economy and is often used as a testbed for new products especially in electronics and technology. When you want to experience what is going to be realised in 10-20 years then the starting point is Korea.

“Korea is also expanding and building many other connections with other markets in Asia, so it will be very advantageous for UK students to study or partner with companies there. We are so far away, but it is now a globalised world and the possibilities are almost limitless.”

Mr Gunn added that every Korean would like to do business in English and the visit would give Korean students a chance to practice their language skills as the UK looks to Asia post-Brexit.

“It’s an opportunity for both the students in the UK and in Korea to encounter a different culture that will stimulate them and give them a broader perspective, which will be great for them,” he said.

“The students from the UK visiting and experiencing Korea will not regret it, I guarantee it.”

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Capital City College Group launches new Women’s Network

A Women’s Network has been launched by Capital City College Group (CCCG) to promote equality and raise the profile of women across the Group.

The first meeting of the network, chaired by Hilary Moore, Assistant Principal at the College of Haringey, Enfield and North East London, featured a panel of inspiring women:

The panellists shared how they got to where they are today and discussed their experiences at work and how woman can support each other in the workplace and their advice to other women.

The Women’s Network was set up by CCCG’s Learning and Development Team, which hopes to establish similar groups to inspire colleagues and promote inclusivity.

The event combined an in-person event at Westminster Kingsway College’s Victoria Centre and a live stream on YouTube for those unable to attend.

Watch a recording of the live stream here: CCCG Women’s Network Launch – Panel Discussion

Molly Elliston, Group Learning and Development Business Partner, said: “At CCCG, we’re very proud that our Group Leadership Team is gender-balanced and represents our workforce. We believe is right and important to celebrate our women role models, and recognise we have many inspirational women leaders among our teachers, managers, support staff and students

“We started the Women’s Network in response to feedback from colleagues who told us that they would like more peer-to-peer support across the Group on issues that matter to them. We hope it will give colleagues more opportunities to share their experiences that will lead to an even more inclusive working environment. Our network chairs will also support us in making valuable contributions and important decisions relating to our equality, diversity and inclusion plans.

“We hope that the launch of the Women’s Network will be the first of many more sessions, which will bring us closer together and encourage others to start more networks to do the same.”  

Here are some memorable quotes from the chair and the panellists of the first meeting of the Women’s Network.

Hilary Moore

Chair and Assistant Principal at the College of Haringey, Enfield and North East London

I came from a background where my parents were the first generation going to university. When I was 11, I decided I was going to become a lawyer. When I went to sixth form college, the careers team, which were nowhere near the quality we have across CCCG, said, “I don’t think it’s a good idea, you might get the grades, but you’ve got no contacts and you’re a woman. Why don’t you become a legal secretary?” I went home and told my mum, who said, “Well I’m not having that,” and my father said, “How ridiculous,” in a very broad Yorkshire accent. I carried on and got a law degree and became a lawyer. It’s things like background and support that can make such a difference.

Sarah Veale CBE

Former Head of the Equality and Employment Rights at the TUC

Workplaces are often competitive. Women sometimes get into this mode of thinking I’ve got to be extra good and fit in better than everybody else in order to be in the same place as the men they’re competing with. It’s about building confidence and challenging the parameters you’re working in.

I’ve noticed that if men are in charge of an interviewing process, they tend to use words like assertive and dynamic. It’s all about power, but never valuing softer skills, like someone who can bring people together and who can explore situations and find solutions by working with other people. It’s a question of elevating the sorts of skills that women are often much better than men, which are valuable to the whole entity, and then owning and pushing them up towards the front.

Apinder Sidhu

Diversity and Inclusion Lead at the Education and Training Foundation

I was raised in an area of west London that is predominantly Asian where there is a culture about how you’re perceived as a woman. I left and went to university, but a lot of girls didn’t go and got married because that was the expectation. Luckily my father told us, “You need to do what you need to do, and we’ll talk about marriage later on.”

There’s a dichotomy of what it is like to be a woman growing up with the pressures of culture and community and wanting to listen to your inner voice and do what makes you happy. I’ve had that pressure growing up and going into leadership, looking at how other women did things and what resonates with me. Individuality is really important. It’s not always about being inspiring. When you are genuine and authentic people look up to you.

Emma Case

Founder of Women Beyond the Box, a platform supporting neurodivergent women

There is a quote that says, ‘You can’t be what you can’t see’ and I think that is so important. Representation matters, and we often take it for granted. I currently live in Lisbon, Portugal, and I’ve noticed on television there are very few women, and very few black and brown women. I just wonder what that does to young children because we don’t aspire beyond what we’re told we can be. It isn’t just the verbal, it’s the visual impact, and that is the challenge. It is about intervention and being intentional and making sure everybody sees and experiences something that they can relate to.

Fathia Abiola-Ajishafe

A-Level student and member of the Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Committee at City and Islington College

Being a black girl from a less well-off area in London makes me feel like I’m not going to have as many opportunities or experiences as someone who grew up in a richer area. But what I do know is that no matter what or where you come from, you can do it. We may not have as many resources or experiences, but there is always a way to get somewhere. That’s what really keeps me going.